Category Archives: Habitat and Species Conservation

Celebrating the elephant

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We recently shared the story about how the Singita Grumeti Fund is working to train dogs in their anti-poaching and conservation efforts.  So who are these dogs protecting?

The Tanzania area’s elephant population, for one.

The escalation of poaching, habitat loss, and human-elephant conflict are just some of the threats to both African (less than 400,000 worldwide) and Asian (less than 40,000 worldwide) elephants.

Working towards better protection for wild elephants, improving enforcement policies to prevent the illegal poaching and trade of ivory, conserving elephant habitats, are the goals that numerous elephant conservation organizations are focusing on around the world, including the Singita Grumeti Fund.

And it’s working. The project has seen a fourfold increase in their elephant population. That’s why on World Elephant Day – and everyday, you should consider supporting the Singita Grumeti Fund.

 

Happy Audubon Day

April 26th is the anniversary of the birth of John James Audubon (1785), an American ornithologist (one that studies birds), naturalist, and painter.  He conducted his first scientific studies from his father’s Pennsylvania estate. After trying and failing in several different types of business ventures, he concentrated on drawing and studying birds, and began traveling around the country to pursue this work.

His major work, a color-plate book entitled The Birds of America (1827–1839), is considered one of the finest ornithological works ever completed.

He is remembered as one of the most important naturalists of his era, and his respect and concern for the natural world clearly marks him as one of the forefathers of the modern conservationism and environmentalism movements. In 1886, the first bird-preservation society, the National Audubon Society, was named in his honor. Countless wildlife sanctuaries, parks, streets and towns also bear his name and honor his legacy.

And here at T4CI, we think this quote from Audubon has the deepest meaning:

 

What’s your favorite wildlife film?

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Grab some popcorn, because it’s time for T4CI’s top film picks during International Wildlife Film Week.

We all have our favorites and it’s interesting to see how diverse the selection is.

Take a look, and let us know what your favorite wildlife move is by sharing it in the comments.

Carolyn:  March of the Penguins

Kristin: Planet Earth

Kvetka: The Edge

Laura: The Bear

Jessica: The Fight for Survival

Shannon: Out of Africa

Tenzin:  Gorillas in the Mist

National Dolphin Day

Who doesn’t love dolphins!?

And since April 14 is National Dolphin Day, we’re taking a moment to honor these charismatic animals and those who help them.

What you may not know is these animals are threatened by many human-made issues: climate change, destructive commercial fishing operations, and even collisions with boats.

And that’s where many of T4CI’s projects are stepping in to help.  Find out more at http://t4ci.org/sponsored

 

 

Week of the Ocean: What do you know?

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This week is the National Week of the Ocean.  Yet we know very little about the waters that cover 70% of the earth’s surface and holds 96% of all the water in the world.

But there are things we have discovered over the years. Let’s see how much you know by taking the quiz below!

How much do you know about our oceans?

It's the National Week of the Ocean. How much do you know about these bodies of water and its inhabitants?

Habitat sweet habitat

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April is World Habitat Awareness Month. It celebrates the Earth’s diverse natural habitats, but also reminds us of their fragile nature. Not only are species endangered, so too are many of the world’s habitats.

Which habitat should you most likely should be in? Find out by taking out quiz. (And don’t forget to share your results!)

Which Habitat is Right for You?

Celebrate World Habitat Awareness Month by taking this fun quiz to find out what habitat is right for you!

Celebrating International Day of Forests

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Today marks the United Nations’ fifth annual International Day of Forests, a day to celebrate the important and diverse contributions of the world’s forests and help to protect the health of forest ecosystems worldwide.

Forests presently cover 30 per cent of the Earth’s land area, or nearly 4 billion hectares. Sustainably managed forests are healthy, productive, resilient and renewable ecosystems which provide essential goods and services to people worldwide. An estimated 1.6 billion people – 25 per cent of the global population – depend on forests for subsistence, livelihood, employment and income generation.

Forests provide goods such as wood, food, fuel, fibre, fodder, and other non-wood products. They provide a range of ecosystem services, from soil, land, water and biodiversity conservation to climate change mitigation and adaptation, from clean air to reducing the risk of natural disasters including floods, landslides, droughts, and dust and sand storms.

Here’s more information on the celebration.

Quiz: Yellowstone National Park

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Way back 145 years ago, Yellowstone was made into the first national park in the US.

Native Americans had lived and hunted in the region that would become Yellowstone for hundreds of years before the first Anglo explorers arrived. Abundant game and mountain streams teaming with fish attracted the Indians to the region, though the awe-inspiring geysers, canyons, and gurgling mud pots also fascinated them.

John Colter, the famous mountain man, was the first Anglo to travel through the area. After journeying with Lewis and Clark to the Pacific, Colter joined a party of fur trappers to explore the wilderness. In 1807, he explored part of the Yellowstone plateau and returned with fantastic stories of steaming geysers and bubbling cauldrons. Some doubters accused the mountain man of telling tall tales and jokingly dubbed the area “Colter’s Hell.”

Before the Civil War, only a handful of trappers and hunters ventured into the area, and it remained largely a mystery.

The key to Yellowstone’s future as a national park, though, was the 1871 exploration under the direction of the government geologist Ferdinand Hayden. Hayden brought along William Jackson, a pioneering photographer, and Thomas Moran, a brilliant landscape artist, to make a visual record of the expedition. Their images provided the first visual proof of Yellowstone’s wonders and caught the attention of the U.S. Congress, who in 1872 made it a park.

What do you know about this special place?  Take our quiz to see!

How much do you know about Yellowstone National Park?

In honor of the 145th anniversary (technically on Feb. 29th) of Yellowstone being made the first National Park, we wanted to test your knowledge about the historic area.

Forget the groundhog; focus on wetlands

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Punxsutawney Phil saw his shadow and has determined that, on this Groundhog Day, winter isn’t going anywhere soon.

Yet, in all the pomp and circumstance of the annual occasion, Phil forgot to mention it is also World Wetlands Day, and how losing wetlands has more effect on us than his weather forecasting.

Chances are, you are more familiar with a wetland than you are with a woodchuck. Wetlands are a critical part of our natural environment. They protect our shores from wave action, reduce the impacts of floods, absorb pollutants and improve water quality. They provide habitat for animals and plants and many contain a wide diversity of life, supporting plants and animals that are found nowhere else.

On this day in 1971, the Ramsar Convention on Wetlands was adopted in the Iranian city of Ramsar to provide the framework for national action and international cooperation for the conservation and wise use of wetlands, which cover more than 6 percent of the earth.

However, that doesn’t mean the wetlands are doing as well as the famous rodent. Here are the facts:

  • Global wetlands have declined between 64 – 71 percent since 1900.
  • The annual cost of the loss of wetland ecosystem services is more than $20 trillion.

Instead of worrying about how accurate a groundhog can be predicting the weather, which statistically is only 36 percent since 1969, consider instead using this day to support our wetlands. Go to t4ci.org/sponsored to see the many sponsored projects which are making a difference.

It’s for the birds.

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You may know that birds are the barometer of the ecosystem health and the alert system for detecting global environmental ills.

But what you may not know is today is National Bird Day.  Each year on January 5, the official holiday is scheduled to coincide with the end of the annual Christmas Bird Count. It lasts three weeks and is the longest running citizen science survey in the world that helps to monitor the health of our nation’s birds.

In honor of this day, T4CI would like to salute a few of our projects who work to ensure birds throughout the world are healthy and singing a happy tune.

Junglekeepers works to keep part of the pristine amazon rainforest from deforestation and agriculture, to preserve it for all the horticulture and animals who live there, include 1500+ species of birds.

And where would we be without our farm birds including chicken, ducks and geese? Animal Agriculture Reform Collaborative is a diversified stakeholders group working together to fight factory farming. Their goal: to change the system that respects the welfare of our planet, including the livestock within our ecosystems.

Of course, many of our T4CI projects help birds in one way or another (as well as our planet), check them out at http://T4CI.org/sponsored

How about a tweet to share this? Simply click on the link below.

Tweet: It’s National Bird Day. Find out some of the ways we are helping them: http://ctt.ec/6U5jI+