Category Archives: Economic Development

Save the koala

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We all know this cuddly bear with its round, furry ears and big nose. They look so cute carrying around their cub in the pouch or on its back. Sadly, the Koalas are an endangered species since most of its habitat is being cleared out.

On September 29, it’s Save the Koala Day where awareness about these furry little creatures is raised so that we can help conserve the Koalas and their homes.

The habitat that Koalas need to survive is increasingly being cleared, and 80 per cent of the Koala’s natural habitat has already been destroyed which have resulted in the extinction of local Koala populations. Only less than 80,000 Koalas are remaining, possibly as few as 43,000. If this rate of decline continues then the Koala is at risk of extinction.

So to spread some love and awareness about these cute, furry animals; Here’s five facts we bet you didn’t know about the koala:

Written by Lærke Vendel Steen, visiting communications and marketing intern from Denmark.

It’s apple season – and for good reason

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Since autumn is finally here, along comes one of our favorite treats: apples.  It’s no wonder we celebrate Johnny Appleseed on September 26th.

Plus, it doesn’t hurt as a good excuse for making yummy apple treats, or maybe a delicious apple pie!

On that day, we applaud the pioneer nurseryman, John Chapman, who spread apple seeds across the young Midwest United States and who we have to thank for apple trees all over America today!

John Chapman was an apple orchardist, traveling the young Mid Atlantic, planting trees on his way – whereas he was given the name Johnny Appleseed. During his travels, he would teach landowners how to establish nurseries of apple trees and how to keep deer and other animals from eating the sprouts. Appleseed was also an animal rights activist and condemned all cruelty towards all living creatures, even insects.

Considered ahead of his time, Johnny Appleseed became an icon of the conservation movement. He is truly an example of how one individual can make a great impact!

One of our projects, Save Our Urban Landscape (SOUL), has become a modern-day Johnny Appleseed.  By planting thousands of trees in the city of New Orleans, they are creating thriving urban forests which have a significant impact on the environmental challenges facing New Orleans.

And just like Johnny Appleseed, SOUL envisions growing and training a workforce of urban farmers who have the potential to play a viable role in green infrastructure. These farms can generate green jobs while also providing food access in marginalized neighborhoods.

But like Johnny Appleseed, remember that you, too, can make a difference. Support our own Johnny Appleseed of New Orleans with a tax-deductible donation to SOUL.

Written by Lærke Vendel Steen, visiting communications and marketing intern from Denmark.

Living with Floods in Louisiana

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“An estimated 6.9 trillion gallons of rain fell on Louisiana between Aug. 8-14. In less than one week, 31.30 inches fell….[w]e must think about how we can learn to live with water, even at this scale of inundation. We can’t avoid the rain, but we can prevent the flood.”
~Susannah Burley and Andreas Merkl, The ADVOCATE, Baton Rouge, Sept. 1, 2016.

Susannah is the project director of Sustaining Our Urban Landscape (SOUL), one of our newer projects focused on driving a resilient and equitable New Orleans through strengthening local water and food systems. Andreas Merkl, is a resident of New Orleans, Chairs the SOUL Advisory Committee, and is the CEO of Ocean Conservancy.

Read the Full Article here and learn more about SOUL here and here.

Photo Credit: Prairieville, LA, Photo by J.T. Blatty/FEMA

Welcome to the Grumeti Community and Wildlife Conservation Fund!

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TCI is pleased to welcome the Grumeti Community and Wildlife Conservation Fund to our growing portfolio of Habitat and Species Conservation programs! Based in Tanzania, the Grumeti Fund works to safeguard and enhance Africa’s Serengeti ecosystem in the Singita Grumeti reserve.  Grumeti Fund’s programs are diverse and include habitat protection, anti-poaching activities, fire management, the prevention of invasive species that threaten the native ecosystem, environmental education, and natural resource conservation.  Grumeti Fund also supports surrounding communities by helping them meet basic needs through the development of clean water systems and by fueling sustainable jobs and resource-based enterprises.

Founded by seasoned international conservationists, the Grumeti Fund is a Tanzanian non-governmental organization.  In the United States, the Grumeti Fund is sponsored by TCI and tax-deductible contributions received by TCI are regranted to the Grumeti Fund to support their charitable work.

Learn more about the Grumeti Fund.