Category Archives: Climate Change

Bay Area Resilient by Design is hiring!

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The Bay Area Resilient by Design Challenge (RbD) is an international design competition that will propose innovative, scalable, and financeable resilience projects on 10 sites along the San Francisco Bay shoreline.

Over the course of 15 months, RbD will invite Bay Area, national, and international designers, architects, developers, and financiers to create and implement visionary, realistic, and replicable solutions that enable neighborhoods and communities to adapt now to the future effects of rising sea levels, increasing storms and flooding, and seismic vulnerabilities. These solutions will be developed in partnership with residents, businesses, and community-based organizations, and with local and regional political leaders. Just as important, they will bring multiple benefits to those communities and the region, e.g., protecting at-risk populations, enhancing the natural environment, and bolstering critical infrastructure.

Currently the organization is hiring for two positions.

Communications Manager – who will work with the Managing Director to develop and execute all communications strategies, outreach, and materials.

Administrative Project Assistant – who will support the rest of the RbD team, including the Managing Director and Program Managers. The assistant role includes coordinating agendas, meeting and event planning, travel, and supporting the Executive Board and other committee work.

Find out more details about these two positions here:  http://t4ci.org/about/jobs.php

New Job Opening: Community Outreach Director at Bay Area Resilient by Design

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The Bay Area: Resilient by Design Challenge  (RbD) is a proactive response to the increasing threat of climate change in the San Francisco area.

Bay Area and international designers, architects, developers, and financiers will work to create and implement visionary, realistic, and replicable solutions that enable neighborhoods and communities to adapt now to the future effects of rising sea levels, increasing storms and flooding, and seismic vulnerabilities.

Currently, RbD is searching for their community outreach director, which is a 15 month position. Find out more here: http://t4ci.org/about/pdf/RbD_COD-03062017.pdf

 

And that’s the way it is: T4CI salutes Walter Cronkite

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Walter Cronkite

On this day in 1981, Walter Cronkite, did his final sign off as the anchor for CBS news.  He had held the post since 1962, and is as iconic as the news he covered.

As ‘the most trusted man in America’, he reported many events from 1937 to 1981, including:

  • bombings in World War II
  • the Nuremberg trials
  • combat in the Vietnam War
  • the Dawson’s Field hijackings
  • Watergate
  • the Iran Hostage Crisis
  • and the assassinations of President John F. Kennedy, civil rights pioneer Martin Luther King, Jr., and Beatles musician John Lennon.

He was also known for his extensive coverage of the U.S. space program, from Project Mercury to the Moon landings to the Space Shuttle. He was the only non-NASA recipient of a Moon-rock award.

That’s what most people remember… yet, there is so much more. Cronkite was passionate about environmental issues and sustainability, long before it was cool to be.

An avid sailor, Cronkite became an advocate of the conservation of rivers, lakes, bays, and seas. He kept a framed photo over his desk of the earth rising as seen from the moon, to keep reminding himself to help protect the planet.

Cronkite had CBS Reports investigate two environmental catastrophes that occurred that year in 1969: the Santa Barbara oil spill  and the Cuyahoga River fire in Ohio. And the old reporter saw the future:  “The North American continent seemed ringed by oil slicks off Alaska, off Nova Scotia, off Florida, and most dramatically, in the Gulf Coast off Louisiana,” he said. And that changed the way the news covered the environment.

CBS News producer Ron Bonn recalled precisely when Cronkite put the network on the front line of the fight:

 It was New Year’s Day, 1970, and Walter walked into the Broadcast Center and said, ‘goddamnit, we’ve got to get on this environmental story.'”

When Walter said ‘goddamnit,’ things happened.”

Cronkite and Bonn launched “Can the World Be Saved?” news segments in the spring of 1970. Pollution, over-population and even climate change were stories that became major news as a result. And Cronkite shared his judgments openly: to make change, we had to demand it.

Cronkite’s insisted CBS News played a major role in publicizing the first Earth Day in the United States, on April 22, 1970 which included  CBS News Special Report anchored by the veteran journalist.

Even after his retirement on this day in 1981, he was outspoken for the planet.

In 2004, he wrote an op-ed that criticized then President George W. Bush’s State of the Union address:

(Bush) spoke of the nation’s problems and the dangers it faces, particularly in regard to national security, but he gave no indication that he recognizes the dangers of global warming.

Surely it has been brought to his attention that scientists are increasingly alarmed over the rapidity with which the world’s environment is being poisoned by the refuse of human endeavor. Climate change and the extinction of species are the focus of their deep concern. They warn that there is no time to spare: Unless we begin a major effort by the end of this century, further efforts will be too late…

…The politicians seeking office, including the president seeking reelection, are unlikely to give the environment the attention it deserves unless the people demand it. And the people aren’t going to demand it unless somebody brings the problem, and particularly its urgency, to their attention.

The media has a responsibility on their shoulders whose importance cannot be exaggerated: to give the story of our deteriorating environment the attention it needs to alert the population to action. That action would demand that governments – city, state and national – generate and enforce the laws that can at least begin the immense job of cleaning up our lands, our seas and our air so that living things, including humans, shall not perish from the Earth.

One must wonder, what the “most trusted man in America,” who died in 2009, would think about today’s news coverage and it’s impact on the planet he loved.

What do you think?  What would he encourage his viewers to do?

Black History Month: Honoring Warren Washington

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T4CI is saluting some of the most influential African-American environmentalists and sustainability professionals during Black History Month.

Today we honor Warren Washington.

Washington is an internationally recognized expert in atmospheric sciences and climate research specializing in computer modeling of the Earth’s climate. In recent years he has served his science in a broad range of capacities. He was appointed to the National Science Board in 1994, reappointed in 2000, and became chair from 2002-2006.

Global climate models developed by Dr. Washington were used in the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change’s 2007 assessment for which atmospheric scientists, including Dr. Washington, won the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize.

In addition to pioneering research in climate change, Dr. Washington also strove for social change within the science community.

As the second African-American to receive a Ph.D within the atmospheric sciences, Dr. Washington strove to increase scientific opportunities for young researchers from many different backgrounds, including women and minorities. Throughout the years, he served as a science advisor to former Presidents Carter, Reagan, Bush Sr., and Clinton.

On November 17, 2010, Dr. Washington received the National Medal of Science from President Barack Obama at the White House. The National Medal of Science is the highest honor given by the US government to the nation’s scientists, engineers, and inventors.

 

 

It’s more than just the weather.

In 1870:

  • the United States 15th Amendment was ratified, giving African American males the right to vote.
  • Christmas became a national holiday.
  • The Franco-Prussian War began.

And the US Weather Bureau, the precursor to the National Weather Service (NWS) was created on February 7.  Post-war generals wanted accurate weather forecasts for battles.

Its first forecast later that year:

High winds at Chicago and Milwaukee… and along the Lakes.

We all know that was an easy one to forecast. However since that time, the NWS has expanded their technology and reach, including helping to forecast climate change.

Take a look:

Want to learn more about becoming a climate community, using some of the knowledge and discoveries from the NWS?  Check out Climate Communities International.

Rockefeller Foundation gives $4.6 million grant to T4CI project, Bay Area: Resilient by Design

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Excited to announce a new $4.6M grant from The Rockefeller Foundation to help the Bay Area with our new project, Bay Area: Resilient by Design Challenge. This new competition seeks to tackle the very real threat of climate change by bringing together top innovators, policymakers, designers, architects, developers, and others to create long-lasting infrastructure solutions for the San Francisco Bay Area.

Most importantly, this challenge will bring together communities and in turn solutions that will yield multiple benefits to both today’s and tomorrow’s challenges.

This innovative challenge is the first-ever to be modeled after the award-winning Rebuild by Design Hurricane Sandy Design Competition, which was pioneered by the US Department of Housing and Urban Development in partnership with The Rockefeller Foundation.

Resilient by Design will be divided into two phases:

  1. In the first phase, teams will participate in a three to six month research and community engagement period to develop and propose design solutions for specific
    sites.
  2. Phase two of the challenge will be a collaborative design phase with teams working in partnership with residents, businesses, community-based organizations, and political leaders to develop implementable infrastructure projects.

Beginning in April 2017, Resilient by Design will invite designers, architects, developers, and financial supporters to create and begin implementing 10 visionary, realistic, and replicable design solutions.

Find out more here:  http://www.resilientbayarea.org/

Living with Floods in Louisiana

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“An estimated 6.9 trillion gallons of rain fell on Louisiana between Aug. 8-14. In less than one week, 31.30 inches fell….[w]e must think about how we can learn to live with water, even at this scale of inundation. We can’t avoid the rain, but we can prevent the flood.”
~Susannah Burley and Andreas Merkl, The ADVOCATE, Baton Rouge, Sept. 1, 2016.

Susannah is the project director of Sustaining Our Urban Landscape (SOUL), one of our newer projects focused on driving a resilient and equitable New Orleans through strengthening local water and food systems. Andreas Merkl, is a resident of New Orleans, Chairs the SOUL Advisory Committee, and is the CEO of Ocean Conservancy.

Read the Full Article here and learn more about SOUL here and here.

Photo Credit: Prairieville, LA, Photo by J.T. Blatty/FEMA

Root Solutions and the Story of Stuff

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RSIt’s very exciting to see one of our projects, Root Solutions, featured for the cool work that they are doing, and what better place to be featured than on the Story of Stuff Project blog?

Root Solutions is dedicated to providing conservationists and policy makers with tools and resources informed by the proven methods of behavioral science, allowing them to create more effective campaigns, polices and strategies that reflect how people process information and make decisions. With techniques like, “green nudges,” people can be motivated to use behavior that is  both good for them and good for the environment.

The project is the brainchild of Nya Van Leuvan and Rod Fujita, who met at the Environmental Defense Fund where they led the introduction of decision science to their colleagues. The project is also producing a book called “Choices for Change: Using Behavioral Insights to Save the Planet,” which they hope will help policy-makers, advocates, and the general public understand how to frame and encourage behavior that makes conservation a part of our daily lives.

Read more about how behavioral science can improve conservation outcomes at the Root Solutions  website and on the Story of Stuff blog!

Welcome, Climate Communities International!

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batumi bikeshare 2The Trust for Conservation Innovation is excited to announce the addition of Climate Communities International (CCI) to our conservation community, specifically addressing Environmental Education, Outreach, and Advocacy. CCI directly empowers university faculty and students to design and carry out local solutions through peer networking; partnering with other universities, international experts, and donors; and the acquisition of skills and resources necessary to address climate-related impacts in their communities. CCI is instilling college students with a passion for taking action against climate change and providing them with the tools to accomplish those goals, and we are so proud to have them as a project partner.

Learn more about Climate Communities International here